30 Nov 2018

Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1

Author: Kevin Gallo
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At Build 2018, I had the privilege of sharing with you some of the advancements for Microsoft 365 that centered on multi-sense and multi-device experiences. Today, developers can get the latest Windows 10 SDK and start using some of these amazing platform capabilities.

What’s in this update:

  • Windows UI Library (WinUI) allows you take advantage of the latest Fluent controls and styles for Windows 10 apps without having to wait for all your customers to update to the latest OS version. The WinUI nuget package is backward-compatible, down to Windows 10 version 1607 (Anniversary Update) and includes the same powerful, supported controls that Windows uses in its apps and experiences.
  • UWP XAML hosting API (Preview) allows ‘islands’ of UWP XAML UI elements to be hosted in applications built using non-UWP technologies such as Windows Forms, WPF, or C/C++ Win32, eliminating the need to re-write or re-package your application for UWP. We’ve created a set of WPF and WinForms wrappers for common UI elements that developers can use to save time.
  • Adaptive Cards 1.1 boosts feature additions such as Media Element and Action Icons and building cards easier with the new visual designer. Adaptive Cards is available in Outlook as Actionable Messages, in Cortana with Skills, and Teams through Azure Bot Service.
  • Graph Notifications (Preview) offers an enterprise-compliant, people-centric, and cross-platform notifications platform using Microsoft Graph. The tech preview supports iOS, Android, Windows, and the Graph Explorer.
  • Project Ink Analysis allows you to write applications that allow users to draw and express themselves and offers the capabilities to understand/recognize and make the ink more productive. This is the same technology we use to power Office today.
  • Hyper-V allows Android developers on Windows to enjoy a fast Android emulator running the latest Android APIs, all on Hyper-V. The minimum requirements to run this are Windows 10 version 1803 on an x86 based machine and Visual Studio v15.8 for IDE support.
  • It’s easier to start using the new Windows Machine Learning API, as it’s the same for both Win32 and UWP applications. New capabilities include: support for ONNX v1.2.2 models, converting FP32 datatypes in ONNX models to use FP16, support for Windows Server 2019, and improved evaluation times on the CPU and GPU.

Tune into Microsoft Connect () 2018 on December 4th to learn about the latest updates and advancements for Azure, Visual Studios, and Windows.

Kevin

Download the Windows 10 SDK here.

The post Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1 appeared first on Windows Blog.

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26 Nov 2018

Windows 10 Tip: Five ways filling out forms online just got easier in Microsoft Edge

Author: Laalithya Boddapati
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You may have already noticed that it’s easier than ever to fill out form details in websites, thanks to several improvements in Microsoft Edge via the Windows 10 October Update. This builds on the multi-field autofill launched in April that gave users the ability to fill out multiple related fields in website forms, such as contact info and credit card details, with one click*.

Keep reading for five ways you can use autofill in Microsoft Edge:

1. Autofill for address fields

You can fill out multiple related fields in website forms – be it your contact or your credit card details – with one click! Microsoft Edge can help you fill your contact information in addresses and related form fields. When filling in these fields on a form, Microsoft Edge can save these details securely so the next time, you can simply select the preferred information from a drop-down menu to complete all the related fields. Addresses saved on one Windows 10 device will also sync across your other Windows 10 devices. You can manually add or remove form entries in Settings.

Screenshot of Microsoft Edge being used to autofill address fields in an order form online

2. Autofill cards on web forms

Microsoft Edge can securely save and help fill your card information on payment web forms. When you enter your card details in an online form, you might notice a prompt with a request to save the card. The next time you visit an eligible site, you can simply select the preferred card from a drop-down menu to autofill the relevant fields. (The CVV information is never saved.) All cards linked to your Microsoft Account are also made available for autofill as Microsoft Pay cards. Autofill for cards is currently available across some of the top retail sites.

Screenshot of Microsoft Edge filling in credit card informaiton

3. Autofill during in-private browsing

Microsoft Edge supports auto-filling of saved passwords during in-private browsing. Clicking on the username field will display the list of available credentials for the website. No new user credentials will be saved, nor any existing credential be updated during in-private browsing. Autofill will also work for addresses and cards on web forms during in-private browsing in a similar way.

4. Notification options for saving passwords

One of the top requests we heard from users was to provide an option to never save password for certain domains. When you choose to never save passwords for a site, you will never be prompted with a save password notification. We also introduced animated icons in the prompts for saving of passwords and cards so you don’t miss these important notifications the next time!

5. Management of autofill settings

We now have a direct shortcut in Settings to manage your autofill experience! You can choose to enable/disable the autofill feature through Settings > Passwords & autofill. Management of the autofill data can be independently done for passwords, forms and cards by simply clicking on Manage passwords, Manage forms and so on. At any point, you can view, modify, add and delete your form data and card data.

Going forward, we’re working towards improving the autofill footprint over more sites. If you’re interested in other Microsoft Edge features, find out more about in the Windows 10 October Update.

*Support may vary based on the website.

The post Windows 10 Tip: Five ways filling out forms online just got easier in Microsoft Edge appeared first on Windows Blog.

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21 Nov 2018

Save money and time with Microsoft Shopping Assistant

Author: Anand Sampathkumaran
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Screenshot of an Amazon product page for holiday lights, with the Microsoft Shopping Assistant frame on the right side with price comparisons

Microsoft Shopping Assistant, first released in 2016 through The Garage, is a browser add-on that helps you get the best deals at more than 50,000 online stores, from top retailers like Amazon and Walmart to your favorite boutique shop on Etsy.

Track prices for products on thousands of stores

Never miss a deal again with the Microsoft Shopping Assistant. When you’re on a product web page, click the heart shaped button in the assistant widget and add it to your Favorites. The assistant will automatically notify you when the price changes, and you can see all price changes from the notifications screen in the assistant.

Compare prices across retailers

Shop smarter with instant price comparisons from other retailers. When you’re shopping online, the assistant will notify you when products you’re looking at are cheaper elsewhere. See how much you can save or if you’re already getting the best deal. You can also find recommendations for similar products.

Stay on top of your shopping everywhere you shop

Forget about keeping multiple tabs open or emailing yourself links of your favorite products. The assistant automatically remembers products you’ve browsed so you don’t have to. You can also organize your shopping with custom boards.

You are always in control

Microsoft Shopping Assistant is built with your security and privacy in mind. You are always in control of your shopping data – you can remove products from the assistant’s history at any time.

Take the assistant shopping with you this holiday season. Add it to your browser and simplify your shopping!

Editor’s note: The name of the add-on was updated following initial publication.

The post Save money and time with Microsoft Shopping Assistant appeared first on Windows Blog.

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20 Nov 2018

Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 18282 available now!

Author: Clint Rutkas
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Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 18282 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 18282 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.

The Preview SDK can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.

For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum. For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.

Things to note:

  • This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017. You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 build 1809 or earlier to the Microsoft Store.
  • The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2017 here.
  • This build of the Windows SDK will install on Windows 10 Insider Preview builds and supported Windows operating systems.
  • In order to assist with script access to the SDK, the ISO will also be able to be accessed through the following URL:  https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?prd=11966&pver=1.0&plcid=0x409&clcid=0x409&ar=Flight&sar=Sdsurl&o1=18282 once the static URL is published.

Breaking Changes

In this Preview SDK we’ll be adding a blend mode to the effect graph of the AcrylicBrush called Luminosity. This blend mode will ensure that shadows don’t appear behind acrylic surfaces without a cutout. We will also be exposing a LuminosityBlendOpacity API available for tweaking that allows for more AcrylicBrush customization.

By default, for those that have not specified any LuminosityBlendOpacity on their AcrylicBrushes, we have implemented some logic to ensure that the Acrylic will look as similar as it can to current 1809 acrylics. Please note that we will be updating our default brushes to account for this recipe change.

API Updates and Additions

Additions:


namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.AppService {
  public sealed class AppServiceConnection : IClosable {
    public static IAsyncOperation<StatelessAppServiceResponse> SendStatelessMessageAsync(AppServiceConnection connection, RemoteSystemConnectionRequest connectionRequest, ValueSet message);
  }
  public sealed class StatelessAppServiceResponse
  public enum StatelessAppServiceResponseStatus
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls {
  public sealed class PhoneLine {
    PhoneLineBluetoothDetails BluetoothDetails { get; }
    void EnableTextReply(bool value);
  }
  public sealed class PhoneLineBluetoothDetails
  public enum PhoneLineTransport {
    Bluetooth = 2,
  }
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls.Background {
  public enum PhoneIncomingCallDismissedReason
  public sealed class PhoneIncomingCallDismissedTriggerDetails
  public enum PhoneLineProperties : uint {
    BluetoothDetails = (uint)512,
  }
  public enum PhoneTriggerType {
    IncomingCallDismissed = 6,
  }
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls.Provider {
  public static class PhoneCallOriginManager {
    public static bool IsSupported { get; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Resources.Core {
  public sealed class ResourceCandidate {
    ResourceCandidateKind Kind { get; }
  }
  public enum ResourceCandidateKind
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService {
  public sealed class JournalPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities {
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
    bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
    bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
    bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
    bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
  }
  public sealed class JournalPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob {
    void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
    void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
    void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
  }
  public sealed class PaymentDevice : IClosable
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceCapabilities
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfiguration
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetConfigurationResult
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceOperationResult
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceTransactionRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceTransactionResult
  public sealed class PaymentMethod
  public enum PaymentMethodKind
  public enum PaymentOperationStatus
  public enum PaymentUserResponse
  public sealed class PosPrinter : IClosable {
    IVectorView<uint> SupportedBarcodeSymbologies { get; }
    PosPrinterFontProperty GetFontProperty(string typeface);
  }
  public sealed class PosPrinterFontProperty
  public sealed class PosPrinterPrintOptions
  public sealed class ReceiptPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities, ICommonReceiptSlipCapabilities {
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
    bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
    bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
    bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
    bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
  }
  public sealed class ReceiptPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob, IReceiptOrSlipJob {
    void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
    void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
    void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
    void StampPaper();
  }
  public struct SizeUInt32
  public sealed class SlipPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities, ICommonReceiptSlipCapabilities {
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
    bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
    bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
    bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
    bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
    bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
  }
  public sealed class SlipPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob, IReceiptOrSlipJob {
    void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
    void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
    void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
  }
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService.Provider {
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceCloseTerminalRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceCloseTerminalRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationReadRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationReadRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationWriteRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfigurationWriteRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnection : IClosable
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnectionTriggerDetails
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnectorInfo
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetTerminalsRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetTerminalsRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceOpenTerminalRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceOpenTerminalRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentAuthorizationRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentAuthorizationRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadCapabilitiesRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadCapabilitiesRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceRefundRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceRefundRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTokenRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTokenRequestEventArgs
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTransactionRequest
  public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTransactionRequestEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.Globalization {
  public sealed class CurrencyAmount
}
namespace Windows.Management.Deployment {
  public enum AddPackageByAppInstallerOptions : uint {
    LimitToExistingPackages = (uint)512,
  }
  public enum DeploymentOptions : uint {
    RetainFilesOnFailure = (uint)2097152,
  }
}
namespace Windows.Media.Devices {
  public sealed class InfraredTorchControl
  public enum InfraredTorchMode
  public sealed class VideoDeviceController : IMediaDeviceController {
    InfraredTorchControl InfraredTorchControl { get; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Connectivity {
  public enum NetworkAuthenticationType {
    Wpa3 = 10,
    Wpa3Sae = 11,
  }
}
namespace Windows.Networking.NetworkOperators {
  public sealed class ESim {
    ESimDiscoverResult Discover();
    ESimDiscoverResult Discover(string serverAddress, string matchingId);
    IAsyncOperation<ESimDiscoverResult> DiscoverAsync();
    IAsyncOperation<ESimDiscoverResult> DiscoverAsync(string serverAddress, string matchingId);
  }
  public sealed class ESimDiscoverEvent
  public sealed class ESimDiscoverResult
  public enum ESimDiscoverResultKind
}
namespace Windows.Security.DataProtection {
  public enum UserDataAvailability
  public sealed class UserDataAvailabilityStateChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class UserDataBufferUnprotectResult
  public enum UserDataBufferUnprotectStatus
  public sealed class UserDataProtectionManager
  public sealed class UserDataStorageItemProtectionInfo
  public enum UserDataStorageItemProtectionStatus
}
namespace Windows.System {
  public sealed class DispatcherQueue {
    bool HasThreadAccess { get; }
  }
  public enum ProcessorArchitecture {
    Arm64 = 12,
    X86OnArm64 = 14,
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition {
  public interface IVisualElement
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition.Interactions {
  public enum InteractionBindingAxisModes : uint
  public sealed class InteractionTracker : CompositionObject {
    public static void SetBindingMode(InteractionTracker boundTracker1, InteractionTracker boundTracker2, InteractionBindingAxisModes axisMode);
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerCustomAnimationStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerIdleStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerInertiaStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public sealed class InteractionTrackerInteractingStateEnteredArgs {
    bool IsFromBinding { get; }
  }
  public class VisualInteractionSource : CompositionObject, ICompositionInteractionSource {
    public static VisualInteractionSource CreateFromIVisualElement(IVisualElement source);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input {
  public class AttachableInputObject : IClosable
  public sealed class InputActivationListener : AttachableInputObject
  public sealed class InputActivationListenerActivationChangedEventArgs
  public enum InputActivationState
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input.Preview {
  public static class InputActivationListenerPreview
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input.Preview.Injection {
  public enum InjectedInputButtonEvent
  public sealed class InjectedInputButtonInfo
  public enum InjectedInputButtonKind
  public sealed class InputInjector {
    void InjectButtonInput(IIterable<InjectedInputButtonInfo> input);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.ViewManagement {
  public sealed class ApplicationView {
    ApplicationWindowPresenterKind AppliedPresenterKind { get; }
    string PersistedStateName { get; }
    public static IAsyncOperation<bool> ClearAllPersistedStateAsync();
    public static IAsyncOperation<bool> ClearPersistedStateAsync(string value);
    bool TrySetPersistedStateName(string value);
  }
  public sealed class UISettings {
    bool AutoHideScrollBars { get; }
    event TypedEventHandler<UISettings, UISettingsAutoHideScrollBarsChangedEventArgs> AutoHideScrollBarsChanged;
  }
  public sealed class UISettingsAutoHideScrollBarsChangedEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml {
  public class ContentRoot
  public sealed class ContentRootRasterizationScaleChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class ContentRootSizeChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class ContentRootVisibilityChangedEventArgs
  public sealed class ContentRootVisibleBoundsChangedEventArgs
  public class UIElement : DependencyObject, IAnimationObject {
    Shadow Shadow { get; set; }
    public static DependencyProperty ShadowProperty { get; }
  }
  public class UIElementWeakCollection : IIterable<UIElement>, IVector<UIElement>
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls {
  public class ContentDialog : ContentControl {
    ContentRoot AssociatedContentRoot { get; set; }
  }
  public class RichEditBox : Control {
    void CopySelectionToClipboard();
    void CutSelectionToClipboard();
    void PasteFromClipboard();
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Primitives {
  public sealed class AppBarTemplateSettings : DependencyObject {
    double NegativeCompactVerticalDelta { get; }
    double NegativeHiddenVerticalDelta { get; }
    double NegativeMinimalVerticalDelta { get; }
  }
  public sealed class CommandBarTemplateSettings : DependencyObject {
    double OverflowContentCompactOpenUpDelta { get; }
    double OverflowContentHiddenOpenUpDelta { get; }
    double OverflowContentMinimalOpenUpDelta { get; }
  }
  public class FlyoutBase : DependencyObject {
    ContentRoot AssociatedContentRoot { get; set; }
    bool IsConstrainedToRootBounds { get; }
    bool ShouldConstrainToRootBounds { get; set; }
    public static DependencyProperty ShouldConstrainToRootBoundsProperty { get; }
  }
  public sealed class Popup : FrameworkElement {
    ContentRoot AssociatedContentRoot { get; set; }
    bool IsConstrainedToRootBounds { get; }
    bool ShouldConstrainToRootBounds { get; set; }
    public static DependencyProperty ShouldConstrainToRootBoundsProperty { get; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Core.Direct {
  public enum XamlPropertyIndex {
    AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeCompactVerticalDelta = 2367,
    AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeHiddenVerticalDelta = 2368,
    AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeMinimalVerticalDelta = 2369,
    CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentCompactOpenUpDelta = 2370,
    CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentHiddenOpenUpDelta = 2371,
    CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentMinimalOpenUpDelta = 2372,
    FlyoutBase_ShouldConstrainToRootBounds = 2378,
    Popup_ShouldConstrainToRootBounds = 2379,
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Hosting {
  public class DesktopWindowXamlSource : IClosable {
    bool ProcessKeyboardAccelerator(VirtualKey key, VirtualKeyModifiers modifiers);
  }
  public sealed class ElementCompositionPreview {
    public static UIElement GetApplicationWindowContent(ApplicationWindow applicationWindow);
    public static void SetApplicationWindowContent(ApplicationWindow applicationWindow, UIElement xamlContent);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Input {
  public sealed class FocusManager {
    public static UIElement FindNextFocusableElementInContentRoot(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot);
    public static UIElement FindNextFocusableElementInContentRoot(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot, Rect hintRect);
    public static object GetFocusedElement(ContentRoot contentRoot);
    public static bool TryMoveFocusInContentRoot(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot);
    public static IAsyncOperation<FocusMovementResult> TryMoveFocusInContentRootAsync(FocusNavigationDirection focusNavigationDirection, ContentRoot contentRoot);
  }
  public class StandardUICommand : XamlUICommand {
    StandardUICommandKind Kind { get; set; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Media {
  public class Shadow : DependencyObject
  public class ThemeShadow : Shadow
  public sealed class VisualTreeHelper {
    public static IVectorView<Popup> GetOpenPopupsWithinContentRoot(ContentRoot contentRoot);
  }
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Media.Animation {
  public class GravityConnectedAnimationConfiguration : ConnectedAnimationConfiguration {
    bool IsShadowEnabled { get; set; }
  }
}
namespace Windows.Web.Http {
  public sealed class HttpClient : IClosable, IStringable {
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryDeleteAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryGetAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryGetAsync(Uri uri, HttpCompletionOption completionOption);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpGetBufferResult, HttpProgress> TryGetBufferAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpGetInputStreamResult, HttpProgress> TryGetInputStreamAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpGetStringResult, HttpProgress> TryGetStringAsync(Uri uri);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryPostAsync(Uri uri, IHttpContent content);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TryPutAsync(Uri uri, IHttpContent content);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TrySendRequestAsync(HttpRequestMessage request);
    IAsyncOperationWithProgress<HttpRequestResult, HttpProgress> TrySendRequestAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, HttpCompletionOption completionOption);
  }
  public sealed class HttpGetBufferResult : IClosable, IStringable
  public sealed class HttpGetInputStreamResult : IClosable, IStringable
  public sealed class HttpGetStringResult : IClosable, IStringable
  public sealed class HttpRequestResult : IClosable, IStringable
}
 

The post Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 18282 available now! appeared first on Windows Blog.

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20 Nov 2018

Keeping you updated on Windows Hello

Author: Nadya Amirchoupani
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At Microsoft, we take your device and account protection seriously, which is why we’ve been on a mission to eliminate passwords. Passwords can be difficult to remember, are often reused and can be used to hack your account anywhere, anytime, from any device. Windows Hello is a key component in our effort to finally saying goodbye to passwords. Using facial recognition, a fingerprint, or PIN, Windows Hello is a fast, secure and password-less way to unlock your Windows 10 PC.1 We’ve been busy bringing the latest and greatest features to Windows Hello and account protection and wanted to take some time to update you on what’s new.

Account protection and sign-in

We’re making it easier than ever to protect your identity on Windows. In the Windows Security app, available on all Windows 10 PCs2, we’ve made updates to the Account Protection page, which clearly alerts you if there’s an action to take to improve your account protection. This page aims to make it as simple as possible for you to protect your account. From here, you can set up Windows Hello for faster, more secure sign-in and you’ll also be alerted if there’s an issue with Dynamic Lock. As a refresher, Dynamic Lock works when you Bluetooth pair your phone3 to your PC – once you’re out of range with your phone, your PC will automatically lock.

We’ve also made it easier to set up Windows Hello from the lock screen, which means no more digging through Settings. Once you’ve signed into your free Microsoft account, you’ll see the Windows Hello icon show up next to the password icon – just click, enter your password, and follow the steps to setting up Windows Hello!

Animation of Windows Hello login interface

Last but certainly not least is our most recent Windows update4: You can now sign in with your Microsoft account to online Microsoft services using Windows Hello or a compatible security key5! A security key is a little USB or NFC (Near Field Communication) device with built-in enhanced security that protects your credentials by requiring biometric or PIN to unlock it. Your Microsoft account provides you access to Microsoft digital services – from accessing your OneDrive, to making purchases in Microsoft Store, and more!

With each update, we’re eradicating places where you’re forced to enter a username and password, bringing you peace of mind that your account is protected and accessed by you, and only you. We’re excited about the journey we’re on and hope you join us on this quest to go password-less!

[1] Requires specialized hardware, including fingerprint reader, illuminated IR sensor or other biometric sensors and capable devices.

[2] Windows 10 April 2018 Update or later required.

[3] Available for selected companion devices and selected Windows 10 editions. ​

[4] Windows 10 October 2018 Update required.

[5] Microsoft-compatible security key required, sold separately from partners, including Yubico and Feitian Technology.

The post Keeping you updated on Windows Hello appeared first on Windows Blog.

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20 Nov 2018

Windows Template Studio 2.5 released!

Author: Clint Rutkas
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We’re extremely excited to announce the Windows Template Studio 2.5!

As always, we love how the community is helping. If you’re interested, please head over to head over to WTS’s Github.

What’s new:

Full list of adjustments in the 2.5 release, WTS’s Github has a full changelog.

Windows Template Studio 2.5

Included in this version:

  • Improved startup time splitting templates by platform/language
  • Improved guidance on Suspend and Resume feature
  • Support for VS 2019
  • Bug fixes
  • Navigation View uses WinUI Library
  • Pages updated with current Fluent guidance

Recently added in prior versions:

  • Multiple Ink pages
  • Data Grid from Windows Community Toolkit page

Dev platform updates:

  • Updated target platform version to 10.0.17763.0 and min target version to 10.0.17134.0
  • Updated Microsoft.NETCore.UniversalWindowsPlatform to 6.1.9
  • AdaptiveCards to 1.1.0
  • AppCenter.Analytics and Microsoft.AppCenter.Crashes to 1.10.0
  • UI.for.UniversalWindowsPlatform 1.0.1.2
  • MVVMLight to 5.4.1.1
  • Windows Community Toolkit to 5.0.0

How to get the update:

There are two paths to update to the newest build.

  • Already installed: Visual Studio should auto update the extension. To force an update, Go to Tools->Extensions and Updates. Then go to Update expander on the left and you should see Windows Template Studio in there and click “Update.”
  • Not installed: Head to https://aka.ms/wtsinstall, click “download” and double click the VSIX installer.

What else is cooking for next versions?

We love all the community support and participation. In addition, here are just a few of the things we are currently building out that will be in future builds:

  • Work for supporting multiple projects in a single solution
  • Menubar navigation pattern template
  • Identity Login
  • Improved Visual Studio 2019 support
  • Adaptive Grid page
  • Azure features starting to be added in

With partnership with the community, we will continue cranking out and iterating new features and functionality. We’re always looking for additional people to help out and if you’re interested, please head to our GitHub at https://aka.ms/wts. If you have an idea or feature request, please make it here!

The post Windows Template Studio 2.5 released! appeared first on Windows Blog.

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20 Nov 2018

Getting Started with Windows Machine Learning

Author: Killian McCoy
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With the Windows 10 October 2018 Update, Windows Machine Learning is out of preview and ready to become part of your AI toolbox. The Windows ML inference engine evaluates trained models locally on Windows devices, removing concerns of connectivity, bandwidth, and data privacy. This video series will help you understand how you can get started with Windows ML and explore the new APIs through the lens of Rufus the robot.

Overview of Windows Machine Learning

What is Windows Machine Learning and why should you care? Killian and Rosane walk through these questions and clarify the positioning and capabilities of this powerful AI inference engine.

Windows Machine Learning: Hello World (MNIST Edition)

Let’s jump to the code! Killian and Rosane work through the Windows ML MNIST tutorial and answer questions developers commonly ask along the way.

Windows Machine Learning: Models and Features

Killian and Rosane (with guest star Rufus!) discuss loading models and understanding how to determine a given model’s expected inputs and output features.

Windows Machine Learning: Device Selection

Killian and Paul (and our robot friend Rufus!) go over how to select a device to run Windows ML model evaluation and uncover what the default option really means.

Windows Machine Learning: Sessions and Bindings

Killian and Paul (and ROS-powered Rufus!) are ready to show you how to evaluate a model with Windows ML, but not before they cover the importance of sessions and bindings to get there.

Providing Feedback & Staying Informed

What Windows ML topics should we cover next? Let us know what you think by tweeting (and following) @killianqueue!

The post Getting Started with Windows Machine Learning appeared first on Windows Blog.

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19 Nov 2018

Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1

Author: Kevin Gallo
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At Build 2018, I had the privilege of sharing with you some of the advancements for Microsoft 365 that centered on multi-sense and multi-device experiences. Today, developers can get the latest Windows 10 SDK and start using some of these amazing platform capabilities.

What’s in this update:

  • Windows UI Library (WinUI) allows you take advantage of the latest Fluent controls and styles for Windows 10 apps without having to wait for all your customers to update to the latest OS version. The WinUI nuget package is backward-compatible, down to Windows 10 version 1607 (Anniversary Update) and includes the same powerful, supported controls that Windows uses in its apps and experiences.
  • UWP XAML hosting API (Preview) allows ‘islands’ of UWP XAML UI elements to be hosted in applications built using non-UWP technologies such as Windows Forms, WPF, or C/C++ Win32, eliminating the need to re-write or re-package your application for UWP. We’ve created a set of WPF and WinForms wrappers for common UI elements that developers can use to save time.
  • Adaptive Cards 1.1 boosts feature additions such as Media Element and Action Icons and building cards easier with the new visual designer. Adaptive Cards is available in Outlook as Actionable Messages, in Cortana with Skills, and Teams through Azure Bot Service.
  • Graph Notifications (Preview) offers an enterprise-compliant, people-centric, and cross-platform notifications platform using Microsoft Graph. The tech preview supports iOS, Android, Windows, and the Graph Explorer.
  • Project Ink Analysis allows you to write applications that allow users to draw and express themselves and offers the capabilities to understand/recognize and make the ink more productive. This is the same technology we use to power Office today.
  • Hyper-V allows Android developers on Windows to enjoy a fast Android emulator running the latest Android APIs, all on Hyper-V. The minimum requirements to run this are Windows 10 version 1803 on an x86 based machine and Visual Studio v15.8 for IDE support.
  • It’s easier to start using the new Windows Machine Learning API, as it’s the same for both Win32 and UWP applications. New capabilities include: support for ONNX v1.2.2 models, converting FP32 datatypes in ONNX models to use FP16, support for Windows Server 2019, and improved evaluation times on the CPU and GPU.

Tune into Microsoft Connect () 2018 on December 4th to learn about the latest updates and advancements for Azure, Visual Studios, and Windows.

Kevin

Download the Windows 10 SDK here.

The post Updated version of Windows 10 SDK now available with Visual Studio 15.9.1 appeared first on Windows Blog.

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19 Nov 2018

Windows 10 Tip: Find out how to setup and use Surface Headphones

Author: Eric Lovelin
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With Surface Headphones, you can tune in to what matters most by tuning out the world around you. With your Headphones and your Surface, your office, studio, or library is wherever you need to be. You’ve got the smarter way to listen.

Surface Headphones can simultaneously connect with up to 10 devices, including your Windows 10 PC, and mobile devices running on iOS and Android. With it, you can listen to music while focusing at your Surface and seamlessly take a call from your phone.

Setting up Surface Headphones

To begin using your Surface Headphones, first pair them with your Windows PC or mobile phone.

  1. Press and release the power button quickly to turn your headphones on. They’ll be discoverable the first time you turn them on and the light will flash white.
  2. On your Windows PC:
    1. Go to Start > Settings > Devices > Bluetooth & other devices > Add Bluetooth or other devices > Bluetooth.
    2. Select Surface Headphones and then choose Done.
  3. On your iOS device, open Settings and tap Bluetooth. Make sure Bluetooth is turned on, and then tap Surface Headphones.
  4. On your Android device, go to Bluetooth settings and pair your Surface Headphones.

Using Surface Headphones

Surface Headphones feature the latest adjustable noise cancellation and great sound in a lightweight, breathable design, so you can listen to your favorite workday music, increase your focus, and get more done.

Play music on your Surface Headphones by using your favorite music app on your mobile device or on your Windows 10 PC. Touch gestures on either ear to quickly play or pause music, or change the tracks.

ToDo this
Play or pause musicTap the touchpad on either ear.
Play the next trackTap the touchpad on either ear twice.
Play the previous trackTap the touchpad on either ear three times.

 

Use your Surface Headphones for phone calls on your mobile device or Skype when connected to your Windows 10 PC.

ToDo this
Answer a callTap the touchpad on either ear twice.
End a callTap the touchpad on either ear twice during a call.
Mute a callPress the mute button on the right ear.
Decline a callTap and hold the touchpad on either ear when you get a call.

When you’re listening to music or on a call, adjust the volume by turning the dial on the right ear. Turning the dial forward increases volume while turning it backward will turn the volume down.

A gif of Surface Headphones and arrows on the right earpiece showing how volume can be adjusted

Surface Headphones also have active noise cancellation, so you can block out external sound to help you focus or relax. For example, you might want to increase noise cancellation when you’re listening to music on a plane or bus, and reduce it when you want to have a quick conversation without taking off your headphones. Turn the dial on the left ear forward to hear less sound around you. Turn it backward to amplify more sound.

Screenshot of the equalizer settingsUsing the companion app for Surface Headphones on your mobile device or Windows 10 PC, you can customize your audio settings for the music you listen to most. Choose an equalizer preset like Rock or Classical, or set your own preferred level of treble and bass. You can also view battery life and volume and noise cancellation levels by using the companion app for Surface Headphones on your mobile device or Windows 10 PC.

 

  • In the U.S., download the Cortana application from the App Store or on Google Play or the Cortana Device Setup app in the Microsoft Store
  • In other countries, setup and customization is available with the Surface Headphones app in the Microsoft Store

Using Surface Headphones with Cortana

Go hands-free to get more done. When you have your headphones connected to your Windows 10 PC, you can use Cortana to control the volume, make calls, join a meeting, set reminders, and more with your voice.

Get Cortana’s attention by doing one of the following:

  • Say “Hey Cortana” and listen for a beep.
  • Tap and hold the touchpad on either ear until you hear a beep.

To use Cortana with your PC, make sure you set up Cortana first:

  1. Sign in to Cortana: select the search box on your PC, and then select Sign in. (To see if you’re already signed in, select Notebook and see if your personal account shows up.)
  2. Sign in to Cortana with your personal Microsoft account—not a work or school account.
  3. Select Devices, then select Get the app. Download the Cortana Device Setup app from the Microsoft Store.

Open Cortana, select Devices, then choose Add a new device. Follow the instructions to finish setting up your Surface Headphones with Cortana.

Editor’s note: Added Windows 10 Tips tag.

The post Windows 10 Tip: Find out how to setup and use Surface Headphones appeared first on Windows Blog.

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09 Nov 2018

Collaborate with others and keep track of to-dos with new AI features in Word

Author: Jared Spataro, Corporate Vice President for Microsoft 365
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Focus is a simple but powerful thing. When you’re in your flow, your creativity takes over, and your work is effortless. When you’re faced with distractions and interruptions, progress is slow and painful. And nowhere is that truer than when writing.

Word has long been the standard for creating professional-quality documents. Technologies like Editor—Word’s AI-powered writing assistant—make it an indispensable tool for the written word. But at some point in the writing process, you’ll need some information you don’t have at your fingertips, even with the best tools. When this happens, you likely do what research tells us many Word users do: leave a placeholder in your document and come back to it later to stay in your flow.

Today, we’re starting to roll out new capabilities to Word that help users create and fill in these placeholders without leaving the flow of their work. For example, type TODO: finish this section or <> and Word recognizes and tracks them as to-dos. When you come back to the document, you’ll see a list of your remaining to-dos, and you can click each one to navigate back to the right spot.

Animated screenshot of a Word document open using the AI-powered To-Do feature.

Once you’ve created your to-dos, Word can also help you complete them. If you need help from a friend or coworker, just @mention them within a placeholder. Word sends them a notification with a “deep link” to the relevant place in the document. Soon, they’ll be able to reply to the notification with their contributions, and those contributions will be inserted directly into the document—making it easy to complete the task with an email from any device.

Over time, Office will use AI to help fill in many of these placeholders. In the next few months, Word will use Microsoft Search to suggest content for a to-do like <>. You will be able to pick from the results and insert content from another document with a single click.

These capabilities are available today for Word on the Mac for Office Insiders (Fast) as a preview. We’ll roll these features out to all Office 365 subscribers soon for Word for Windows, the Mac, and the web.

Get started as an Office for Mac Insider

Office Insider for Mac has two speeds: Insider Fast and Insider Slow. To get access to this and other new feature releases, you’ll need a subscription to Office 365. To select a speed, open Microsoft Auto Update and on the Help menu select Check for Updates.

As always, we would love to hear from you, please send us your thoughts at UserVoice or visit us on Twitter or Facebook. You can also let us know how you like the new features by clicking the smiley face icon in the upper-right corner of Word.

The post Collaborate with others and keep track of to-dos with new AI features in Word appeared first on Microsoft 365 Blog.

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